NKOS - 15th European Networked Knowledge Organization Systems

In collaboration with the German ISKO

Full day workshop: 9:00 AM – 5:30 PM, Friday, September 9th, 2016.

Workshop website: https://at-web1.comp.glam.ac.uk/pages/research/hypermedia/nkos/nkos2016/

 

Workshop Objectives

Knowledge Organization Systems (KOS), in the form of classification systems, thesauri, lexical databases, ontologies, and taxonomies, play a crucial role in digital information management and applications generally. Carrying semantics in a well-controlled and documented way, Knowledge Organisation Systems serve a variety of important functions: tools for representation and indexing of information and documents, knowledge-based support to information searchers, semantic road maps to domains and disciplines, communication tool by providing conceptual framework, and conceptual basis for knowledge based systems, e.g. automated classification systems.

This is a full-day workshop of research projects and development related to next-generation Networked Knowledge Organization Systems/Services (NKOS) in digital libraries. It is a continuation of the well-attended NKOS workshops at previous ECDL, TPDL, JCDL conferences. This year we run the workshop in collaboration with the German ISKO.

The proposed workshop will have three themes as the main focus, together with topical presentations arising from the workshop call for presentations.

1) KOS Alignment. KOS alignment or terminology mapping plays a vital role in NKOS for many years and fits very well to the general theme “Overcoming the Limits of Digital Archives” of TPDL 2016. This year we want to sort out the needs (use cases) of KOS alignments in the new environment of Linked Open Data. We plan to collect methodologies, best practices, guidelines and tools. This includes manual and automatic alignments.

2) KOS Linked Open Data. Recent years have seen an increasing trend to publication of KOS as Linked Data vocabularies. We need discussion of practical initiatives to link between congruent vocabularies and provide effective web services and APIs so that applications can build upon them.

3) KOS and Document Retrieval. Documents or parts of documents are nowadays not only accessible via their metadata but their abstracts and in many cases the full texts are electronically available. Thus, these documents also can be found by search engines. Given this possibility of full text search the role of classification and annotation has to be redefined. Questions like the following ones arise: can traditional knowledge organization and document annotation improve full text retrieval? Are classification, categorisation, annotation, tagging, and full text retrieval complementary, or how can they be made complementary? What should be the focus of annotation, if full text retrieval is available?

 

More information and the workshop call for papers can be found on the workshop website.
https://at-web1.comp.glam.ac.uk/pages/research/hypermedia/nkos/nkos2016/