Panels

Panel Discussion 1: Specialized Information Services - Hype or Important Change in Library Culture?

Tuesday, September 6, 15:30 - 17:00
Location: Niedersachsenhalle B

In the last years the process of generating, disseminating, and archiving new knowledge has changed fundamentally. Beside the increasing amount of new knowledge that needs to be processed, new paradigms and tools for search, access, and exchange have evolved: digital information is discovered, interlinked with curated databases, commented upon, adapted, and shared in Web-based collaborative infrastructures. Recently this need has also been recognized by prominent European funding agencies sparking new funding lines, e.g., the specialized information services program of the German Research Foundation. But is this just the latest hype or a long needed change in library culture? We will discuss this question and see what it means for digital library research. 

Panelists:

  • Wolf-Tilo Balke (Chair, L3S Research Center & TU Braunschweig, Germany)
  • Klaus Ceynowa (Bavarian State Library (BSB), Gemany)
  • Katrin Stump (University Library Braunschweig, Germany)
  • Christoph Kümmel (German Research Foundation (DFG), Germany)
  • Elke Greifeneder (Humboldt University, Germany)
  • Gerhard Lauer (Chair, University Göttingen, Germany)

Panel Discussion 2: Digital Humanities and eInfrastructures

Wednesday, September 7, 15:30 - 17:00
Location: Niedersachsenhalle B

Since the past few years a variety of eInfrastructures have rapidly evolved. The European DARIAH, i.e. Digital Research Infrastructures for the Arts and Humanities, includes currently 17 European member states and is only the most visible eInfrastructure within many others. MERIL, Mapping of the European Research Infrastructure Landscape, lists more than hundred infrastructures for the humanities in Europe. eInfrastructures for art history to philosophy, for museums, archives or for text editions are developed and many are widely used. However, research in the digital humanities cuts often their own path. As a follow up it looks like, as if eInfrastructures are always one or two step behind. Digital humanities Research and infrastructure are still too often two cultures. The panel will discuss reasons for the structural divide, ways to overcome the issues, and best practices, where digital humanities and eInfrastructures are but one research culture.

Panelists:

  • Gerhard Lauer (Chair, University Göttingen, Germany)
  • Tobias Blanke (King's College London, UK)
  • Angus Roberts (University Sheffield, UK)
  • Mike Mertens (DARIAH.eu, Germany)
  • Laurent Romary (INRIA, France)
  • Jane Winters (School of Advanced Study, University of London, UK)

 

Panel Discussion 3 - Why Societies need (digital) libraries

 

Thursday, September 8, 9:00 - 10:30
Location: Niedersachsenhalle B

Since centuries libraries play a crucial role in collecting, curating, archiving and providing information to every interested citizen. The role of librarians in this context is to neutrally guide people to information of interest. With the invention of born digital publications and the Web most information is now directly accessible from any place at any time, and search engines have become the daily tool to find information and to answer questions. On the other hand, the sheer amount of information is overwhelming users, and neutrality and potential bias of online information services is not something we can take for granted. Furthermore, while we are increasingly depending on online information, that information is by definition ephemeral and can be changed easily. It is crucially important to address these issues, and the aim of this panel is to discuss how (digital) libraries can help support appropriate solutions and infrastructures.

Panelists:

  • Thomas Risse (Chair, L3S Research Center & Leibniz University Hannover, Germany)
  • Elisabeth Niggemann (German National Library, Germany)
  • David Bainbridge (University of Waikato and Director of the New Zealand Digital Library Research Project, New Zealand)
  • Jane Winters (School of Advanced Study, University of London, UK)
  • Wolfgang Nejdl (L3S Research Center & Leibniz University Hannover, Germany)